Majority-Liberal Supreme Court Could Transform America

A majority-liberal Supreme Court, for the first time since 1971, could expand women's rights, voting rights for minorities, workers' rights to organize, and improve funding for schools in low wealth neighborhoods. It might reverse Citizens United, which declared that corporations are people and have the right under the free speech clause of the First Amendment … Continue reading Majority-Liberal Supreme Court Could Transform America

A Conservative Giant: Antonin Scalia

Antonin Scalia took his conservative judicial principals seriously, even when reason called for him to take positions in which he didn't like the outcome. He voted to expand the rights of criminal defendants, and dissented in a decision to uphold the legality of the special prosecutor statute in 1988. "He voted in 1989 to strike … Continue reading A Conservative Giant: Antonin Scalia

Hyper-partisan Supreme Court Battles Did Not Begin With Bork

In "How America Was Lost," Paul Krugman laments Republicans' pledge to reject out-of-hand any nomination by President Barack Obama to replace Antonia Scalia, who died of a heart attack. He suggests that Republicans' hyper-partisanship, when the Supreme Court is supposed to be above party, has made America ungovernable. A commenter replies that the hyper-partisanship regarding … Continue reading Hyper-partisan Supreme Court Battles Did Not Begin With Bork

Obama Can Take Credit for High Court’s Gay Marriage Ruling

Quote from Supreme Court's Obergefell decision. Just think, if Barack Obama hadn't been elected president and hadn't appointed two Supreme Court justices, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, there likely would not be a 5-4 Supreme Court decision in favor of gay marriage. Obama's appointments replaced George H.W. Bush appointee David H. Souter and Gerald Ford appointee John Paul Stevens. The 6-3 decision … Continue reading Obama Can Take Credit for High Court’s Gay Marriage Ruling

I Have Forgiven Supreme Court for Bush V. Gore

For years I was angry about the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Bush V. Gore (2000). It seemed like a blatantly political decision, decided on a partisan 5-4 vote, denying the will of the American people, denying the presidency to the winner of the popular vote. It undermined the credibility and objectivity of the high … Continue reading I Have Forgiven Supreme Court for Bush V. Gore

Best Supreme Court Decisions

Loving v. Virginia (1967), legalizing interracial marriage. Heart of Atlanta Motel v. U.S. (1964), upholding the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which outlawed racial segregation in public facilities such as hotels, restaurants and movie theaters. Reynolds v. Sims (1964). "One-person, one-vote is constitutionally required. For any legislative body with districts, all districts must be about the same … Continue reading Best Supreme Court Decisions

5 Worst Supreme Court Decisions and 4 Worst Justices

On nearly every legal scholar's list of worst Supreme Court decisions are Dred Scott (1857), which declared that African Americans are not American citizens; the Civil Rights Cases (1883), which reversed laws outlawing racial discrimination in public facilities;  and Plessy vs. Ferguson (1896), which affirmed segregation and the fraud of "separate but equal" facilities for … Continue reading 5 Worst Supreme Court Decisions and 4 Worst Justices