Will Republicans Offend Voters Enough to Lose the House in 2018?

A Republican Congressman says "bullcrap!" to constituents who remind him they pay his salary. Another asserts that Republicans in Congress work for Donald Trump, not constituents or taxpayers. A legislator from North Carolina equates Abraham Lincoln with Adolph Hitler. A 30-year-old Democrat and political newcomer wins 48 percent of the vote in a solidly Republican … Continue reading Will Republicans Offend Voters Enough to Lose the House in 2018?

Nash County, NC — a National Microcosm — Routinely Swings Politically

NPR: Nash County, NC, county seat Nashville, close to I-95 near the city of Rocky Mount, "lives on a balance beam.┬áIn 2008, it went for John McCain over Barack Obama. In 2012, Obama narrowly beat Mitt Romney in Nash County. In 2016, it was Trump by fewer than 100 votes." So it's important to check … Continue reading Nash County, NC — a National Microcosm — Routinely Swings Politically

Chatham County, NC: My Home County Went For Clinton…After Almost Supporting Bush in 2000 and 2004

Chatham County, NC is one of those sunbelt counties that is growing, due to an influx of people from other states, particularly up North, and becoming more progressive. In 2016, my home county, where I own a house, voted for Hillary Clinton. She won 20,953 to Trump's 17,012. Write-ins and third party candidate won 1600 … Continue reading Chatham County, NC: My Home County Went For Clinton…After Almost Supporting Bush in 2000 and 2004

Political Profiles of the States, Swing States and Tracking Polls

Ballotpedia has published political profiles of each state, courtesy of the Almanac of American Politics 2016. Reading these profiles are essential to fully understanding American politics. The largest states lean heavily toward one candidate: New York, Illinois (Chicago), the Northeast and the West coast states (California, Washington, Oregon) are generally considered Democratic or Clinton territory; … Continue reading Political Profiles of the States, Swing States and Tracking Polls